Melissa Gira Grant

Aug 22

tacoorbeerchallenge:

Finest delivery tacos, paired w/ a beer from the fridge. I made my donation to the New Orleans Abortion Fund (because Louisiana right now, and because my boyfriend was a clinic escort in Baton Rouge when he was a teenager).

This one’s mine. Taco or Beer Challenge: YOU JUST EAT A TACO AND/OR DRINK A BEER AND DONATE TO AN ABORTION FUND.

tacoorbeerchallenge:

Finest delivery tacos, paired w/ a beer from the fridge. I made my donation to the New Orleans Abortion Fund (because Louisiana right now, and because my boyfriend was a clinic escort in Baton Rouge when he was a teenager).

This one’s mine. Taco or Beer Challenge: YOU JUST EAT A TACO AND/OR DRINK A BEER AND DONATE TO AN ABORTION FUND.

Aug 20

Anonymous said: Hi, Lori. I just read a Melissa Gira Grant interview on Guernica, and it left me demoralized. She outlined that women who were against the sex industry need to look at their anxiety/think about it, & how we should forgive men who pay for sex especially if we're in relationships with them b/c they're good people. The whole thing left a bad taste in my mouth b/c it was basically treating feminists as the problem, & protecting "johns". I know you mentioned capitalism is he problem, but I was

loriadorable:

wondering what your opinion is on this (if you don’t mind sharing it)? I don’t like the idea of moral absolutes - that if you recognize problematic aspects of the sex industry that you must hate sex workers. The most insulting part is this idea that we should embrace infidelity and men who pay for sex wholeheartedly. You’re written some multi-faceted things on here, so I was wondering how this kind of piece factors into your particular view? Thank you so much for taking the time to read.

Let’s take a look at what Melissa actually said in the interview that Guernica decided was going to be limited to talking about sex work + feminism.

I think the anti-prostitution feminists need to do some consciousness-raising amongst themselves about their feelings. But that’s a different political activity. Asking ourselves, how do we feel about the fact that our boyfriends, our husbands, our male partners might hire sex workers? They should have that conversation, but they shouldn’t attach it to policy conversations that affect people.

Uh oh, looks like you put words in her mouth such as to change the meaning of her statement completely, conveniently allowing you to elide her point about criminalization! Boo fucking hoo, how awful that you were demoralized to hear you’re a major part of the problem. Guess what? If sex workers had mainstream feminist support as we did in the early 70’s, sex workers would have the same legal protections as women seeking abortions + DV survivors— not much, but a hell of a lot more than what we have now. We’d also have community spaces full of women who are supportive instead of spaces like my women’s studies program where I constantly fear for my continued enrollment lest someone figure out What It Is That I Do + ‘rescue’ me by telling the Dean, who might then expel me for violating the student code of conduct.

THIS— ALLLL of this, including your twisted reading of MGG’s words— is what’s at issue here, not this strawman that “if you recognize problematic aspects of the sex industry[…] you must hate sex workers.” Take your “oh gee golly gosh, whatever could the problem be” bullshit and keep it the fuck out of my inbox.

Lori Adorable, I owe you a drink.

(Also, what’s w/ folks taking this to her Ask box when I’m right here? *waves* *uh, on second thought…*)

Aug 18

“The most radical thing I could think of to do was to make it ordinary.” — Tyler Coates interviewed me for Emily Books, who have selected Playing the Whore as their August pick.

Jul 30

Richard Gere in “Human Trafficking in North Dakota" (via)

Richard Gere in “Human Trafficking in North Dakota" (via)

"There is a website, brbxoxo.com, that “searches online sexcam sites and only broadcasts feeds when the performers are absent.” The rooms themselves are very interesting and vary widely in their layout, decoration, and overall aesthetics. They are not necessarily American. And they are not always beige. If you watch this website for some time you see all kinds of colors and images. In the bottom left room below you can see religious icons. Sometimes there are sex toys left on the beds. To me, the sex-worker rooms look far more “normal” than the big American rooms of YouTube. They seem lived-in and more permanent. Some care has been taken for lighting. Collectively the decorative sense of women who masturbate for the gratification of their customers is more novel, more humane, than the typical empty rooms where people perform for a (much) broader audience. I have no idea why this is." - “The American Room”

"There is a website, brbxoxo.com, that “searches online sexcam sites and only broadcasts feeds when the performers are absent.” The rooms themselves are very interesting and vary widely in their layout, decoration, and overall aesthetics. They are not necessarily American. And they are not always beige. If you watch this website for some time you see all kinds of colors and images. In the bottom left room below you can see religious icons. Sometimes there are sex toys left on the beds. To me, the sex-worker rooms look far more “normal” than the big American rooms of YouTube. They seem lived-in and more permanent. Some care has been taken for lighting. Collectively the decorative sense of women who masturbate for the gratification of their customers is more novel, more humane, than the typical empty rooms where people perform for a (much) broader audience. I have no idea why this is." - “The American Room

Jul 24

(@TabathaSouthey, via @chelseagsummers)

Also, this is exactly why I started “Sex Workers, As Seen From the Art Desk" (dot tumblr dot com) today to collect these as they recur. It began with this utterly stigmapalooza cliche on top of an excellent op-ed by Naomi Sayers about the damage anti-sex work stigma causes.

(@TabathaSouthey, via @chelseagsummers)

Also, this is exactly why I started “Sex Workers, As Seen From the Art Desk" (dot tumblr dot com) today to collect these as they recur. It began with this utterly stigmapalooza cliche on top of an excellent op-ed by Naomi Sayers about the damage anti-sex work stigma causes.

White Slavery, Charles Byron Chrysler, 1911.
(via)

White Slavery, Charles Byron Chrysler, 1911.
(via)

Jul 18

"What does it mean that at the same moment queer and trans people of color are being criminalized for having condoms, a pharmaceutical prevention method is the “hottest” debate among urban white gay and queer men?" (Central to PrEP conversations should be its impact on people living with HIV — Visual AIDS; photo: “Bondage”, 2001, Max Greenberg)

"What does it mean that at the same moment queer and trans people of color are being criminalized for having condoms, a pharmaceutical prevention method is the “hottest” debate among urban white gay and queer men?" (Central to PrEP conversations should be its impact on people living with HIV — Visual AIDS; photo: “Bondage”, 2001, Max Greenberg)